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Creating an IPCop


Enviado por   •  10 de Agosto de 2011  •  1.260 Palabras (6 Páginas)  •  817 Visitas

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The Perfect Linux Firewall Part I -- IPCop

Version 2.3

Author: Joseph Guarino

Last edited 02/22/2006

This document describes how to install the GNU/Linux GPL IPCop firewall and create a small home office network. In the second installment we cover creating a DMZ for hosting your own web server or mail server and the Copfilter proxy for filtering web and email traffic.

This is intended to be a quick and dirty overview on creating a IPCop firewall and comes without warranty of any kind!

What is IPCop

The IPCop project is a GNU/GPL project that offers an exceptional feature packed stand alone firewall to the internet community. Its comprehensive web interface, well documented administration guides, and its involved and helpful user/administrative mailing lists make users of any technical capacity feel at home. It goes far beyond a simple ipchains / netfilter implementation available in most Linux distributions and even the firewall feature sets of commercial competitors.

Firewalls have had to undergo a tremendous metamorphosis as a result of evolving threats. IPCop is exemplary in offering such a range of default features and even further a large set of optional plug-ins which can provide further functionality.

Some of IPCops impressive base install features include: secure https web administration GUI, DHCP Server, Proxying (Squid), DNS Proxying, Dynamic DNS, Time Server, Traffic Shaping, Traffic/Systems/Firewall/IDS graphing, Intrusion Detection (Snort), ISDN/ADSL device support and VPN (IPSec/PPTP) functionality. As if these base features were not an astounding enough there are dozens of add-ons which can further expand the functionality of your IPCop from Web Filtering to Anti virus scanning.

Pre-Requisites for Your IPCop

IPCop installation generally runs 25 minutes, and you can complete it with relatively modest hardware requirements such as a 386 processor with 32MB RAM and >300MB of disk, and 3 Network Cards (2 if there is no need for a DMZ). If you plan to utilize caching proxy, IDS or other add-ons, consider additional horsepower in terms of RAM/Processor.

Building Your IPCop What you need

• 386 Processor with 32MB RAM, 300MB hard disk and 3 Network Cards

• 2 x 5 port 10/100/1000 switch or a Layer 3 switch

• Network Cables

• Burned ISO CD

Architectural Decisions: Segmentation

One essential consideration you have to make before installing is network architecture (segmentation/address space). IPCop uses color-coding system of Red, Green, Blue and Orange to describe the roles or security levels which an interface/network segment will have in protecting your network. Color coding is logical in that it represents a continuum of network access from restricted to permissive. A RED interface is your untrusted interface/segment like the Internet, whereas Green is the trusted interface/segment of your internal network. Additionally, Blue is for a separate segment for Wireless Devices, while Orange is for a DMZ or where any publicly accessible servers you want available to the Internet. In this case we are only configuring a Green/Red/Orange network installation with 3 network interfaces one of which is your cable broadband providers cable modem (Ethernet).

Understanding and Picking your address space

Before you begin it is important to know how your ISP TCP/IP settings. Does your ISP give you a DHCP address or a static IP address? In many cases simply going to your ISP's Support page offers you this information. Most ISPs use DHCP to dynamically allocate IP address space so you get a non-static IP address that applies to your RED interface. Make note of the TCP/IP setting your ISP would have you use before you install.

In architecting your IPCop solution you have the choice of setting up NAT (Network Address Translation) network address space. Green, Blue and Orange networks depend entirely on how many nodes or machines you will have on each network. There are 3 network spaces defined by the standards body, IETF, that can be used for these NAT'ed networks and they are:

10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix)

172.16.0.0

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